the homework controversy

It’s midnight, and Ellie is still wide awake. Her eyes only kept open by ungodly amounts of coffee; she needs to finish her never-ending piles of homework. She realized she would be unable to remain alert in class tomorrow; However, she has no other decision. Excessive, uncontrolled homework is an increasing problem for students. Teachers assign a lot of homework, as they are not aware of the overload students already have. In today’s world, excessive homework has much more negative aspects than positive aspects such as stress, sleep deprivation, physical ailments, less time with family, and finally, loss of childhood.

First, homework should be banned because of the unnecessary stress and strain. All those late nights, kept up open by ungodly amounts of coffee, and papers, which are all symptoms of the nation-sweeping homework epidemic. Broad measures of pressure are put on students each day, and five hours of the school day should be adequate to pick up the materials needed, primarily since they are covering numerous lessons every week. Although some students might be able to complete their schoolwork quickly, that being said, other students crawl along, troubled at a snail’s pace, this indicates that they will likely require extra assistance. Therefore, they are tasked with extra hours of school, and now they are not only assigned to end extra school hours but are now under additional stress to finish everything else before the next day. For instance, homework should be limited to the core classes only, limiting the loads as much as possible because homework does not lead to highly successful students; While many teachers and instructors believe that homework is imperative to student achievement, data shows that homework does not equal success. Correspondingly, Finland has abridged school hours, no standardized tests, and, most importantly, no homework, yet ranked one of the best education systems in the world. 

To extend my point further, homework puts an end to childhood as homework steals children’s ability to play, run, and have a felicitous time. Research from the university of people shows that taking away children’s childhoods will trigger their hatred for schools, leading them to perform dismally on exams due to the fact they hate school. On that account, they wouldn’t even want to try to do well, which would tear down their dynamism for learning, so students need their time to relax, seven hours a day of education makes the student a property of education, as the time spent in education is more than time spent with family. Once a child is on the way back home, they need to spend up to six auxiliary hours doing assignments; Generally, it takes time away from students that might be spent doing things they love, if not, this may lead to depression and loss of self. In any event, we know that education is essential and extremely valued, but denying kids epithermal years of integrity and innocence, is unsparing.

It is true that homework meddles with family time; it’s still an important and valuable part of education. As there are just a couple of hours every school day, there isn’t enough time to cover all the topics students need to study, thus assigning homework allows a broader and more in-depth education. Moreover, the extra practice that assignments provide could help a student struggling to master a concept. However, homework’s primary purpose is to assist students in learning rather than merely “completing work.” Too much homework may encourage cheating because children end up copying off each other to finish all their assignments. Children go to school to get an education, not copy answers from others. For them, it’s just another score; all they care about is submitting their work before 11:59. As a result, there would be no purpose assigning further work when they see the work as just another assignment, and either way, they end up copying each other’s work. Therefore, schools should contemplate decreasing the quantity of homework on students.

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